The International Space Station will be ‘incredibly bright’ as it passes over the UK tonight

Watch tonight! The International Space Station will be ‘incredibly bright’ as it passes over the UK tonight – how and when to see it from YOUR area

  • The ‘incredibly bright’ International Space Station will pass over the UK tonight
  • Over London it will be visible for four minutes from 5:39 p.m. GMT at 10° above the SW
  • In Edinburgh it can be seen for 3 minutes at 17:40 GMT at 10° above the SSW horizon
  • To find out when the ISS can be seen from your area, visit NASA’s Spot the Station

British astronomers will feast tonight as ‘incredibly brilliant’ international space station (ISS) passes overhead in the night sky.

After the wonder of the Artems I launch – and with the excitement of the Cornwall spaceplane’s first liftoff coming in the next few weeks – this is the latest cosmos spectacle to excite space fans.

The orbiting observatory will be ‘incredibly bright’ as it flies over the UK this evening, with peak sightings set for 5.43pm GMT.

More Londonthe space station will be visible for four minutes from 5:39 p.m. GMT at 10° above the southwestern horizon, while in Edinburgh it can be seen for 3 minutes at 17:40 GMT at 10° above the southern, southwest horizon.

Welsh skywatchers in Cardiff can see it for four minutes from 5.39pm GMT at 10° above the southwestern horizon.

Look for!  British astronomers are in for a treat tonight as the International Space Station (ISS)

Look for! British astronomers are in for a treat tonight as the ‘incredibly bright’ International Space Station (ISS) passes overhead in the night sky

The orbital observatory will be

The orbiting observatory will be ‘incredibly bright’ as it flies over the UK this evening, with peak sightings set for 5.43pm GMT. Pictured is a view of the ISS above the United States

WHAT TIME CAN I SEE THE ISS OVER MY CITY?

The space station can be seen over the UK for the next two weeks – and in most cases stargazers will have two opportunities per night.

Over London, the space station will be visible for four minutes from 5:39 p.m. GMT at 10° above the southwestern horizon, while in Edinburgh it can be seen for 3 minutes at 5:40 p.m. GMT at 10° above the south, southwest horizon.

Welsh skywatchers in Cardiff can see it for four minutes from 5.39pm GMT at 10° above the southwestern horizon.

It can be spotted over Manchester, Liverpool, Leeds, Newcastle and much of the Midlands at the same time, including Birmingham and Coventry.

The ISS can also be seen at the same time in southern Britain, but will be visible for one more minute in Bournemouth, Truro and Taunton.

To find out when the ISS will be visible from your exact location, visit the NASA website.Locate the station‘.

It can be spotted over Manchester, Liverpool, Leeds, Newcastle and much of the Midlands at the same time, including Birmingham and Coventry.

The ISS can also be seen at the same time in southern Britain, but will be visible for one more minute in Bournemouth, Truro and Taunton.

It will be one of the brightest objects in the night sky, visible to the naked eye.

All sightings will take place a few hours before or after sunrise or sunset.

This is the optimal viewing period as the sun reflects off the space station’s solar panels and contrasts with the darker sky.

The ISS can be seen over the UK for the next two weeks – and in most cases stargazers will have two opportunities per night.

It will be easy to see it whenever it passes, as it moves across the sky.

The space station will look like a moving star that will be as bright as Venus, with each pass taking between two and four minutes.

The ISS takes just 90 minutes to complete a full circle around the planet as it travels about 280 miles at 17,000 miles per hour above the Earth’s surface.

The space station isn’t always visible at night as it passes overhead, as it spends about 30% of its time obscured by Earth’s shadow.

Sometimes the ISS is the second brightest object in the night sky, surpassed only by the moon.

It will be easy to distinguish it from a passing plane because its bright glow does not flicker.

The ISS takes just 90 minutes to complete a full circle around the planet as it travels around 280 miles at 17,000 miles per hour above the Earth's surface

The ISS takes just 90 minutes to complete a full circle around the planet as it travels around 280 miles at 17,000 miles per hour above the Earth’s surface

Over London, the space station will be visible for four minutes from 5:39 p.m. GMT at 10° above the southwestern horizon, while in Edinburgh it can be seen for 3 minutes at 5:40 p.m. GMT at 10° above the south, southwest horizon.  This shows how the ISS will move and be visible in the night sky

Over London, the space station will be visible for four minutes from 5:39 p.m. GMT at 10° above the southwestern horizon, while in Edinburgh it can be seen for 3 minutes at 5:40 p.m. GMT at 10° above the south, southwest horizon. This shows how the ISS will move and be visible in the night sky

The ISS is a $100bn (£80bn) science and engineering laboratory that orbits 400km above Earth.

It has been permanently occupied by rotating crews of astronauts and cosmonauts since November 2000.

To find out when the ISS will be visible from your exact location, visit the NASA website.Locate the station‘.

The website can give you exact dates, times, sighting direction, and even the brightness of the ISS that will appear from your backyard.

EXPLAINED: THE $100 BILLION INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION IS 250 MILES ABOVE EARTH

The International Space Station (ISS) is a $100bn (£80bn) science and engineering laboratory that orbits 400km above Earth.

It has been permanently occupied by rotating crews of astronauts and cosmonauts since November 2000.

The crews came mainly from the United States and Russia, but the Japanese space agency JAXA and the European space agency ESA also sent astronauts.

The International Space Station has been continuously manned for over 20 years and has been expanded with several new modules added and system upgrades

The International Space Station has been continuously manned for over 20 years and has been expanded with several new modules added and system upgrades

Research conducted aboard the ISS often requires one or more of the unusual conditions found in low Earth orbit, such as low gravity or oxygen.

ISS studies have focused on human research, space medicine, life sciences, physical sciences, astronomy and meteorology.

The US space agency NASA spends around $3bn (£2.4bn) a year on the space station programme, with the rest of the funding coming from international partners including Europe, Russia and Japan.

So far, 244 people from 19 countries have visited the station, including eight individuals who have spent up to $50 million on their visit.

There is an ongoing debate about the station’s future beyond 2025, when it is believed that part of the original structure will reach “end of life”.

Russia, a major partner of the station, plans to launch its own orbital platform around this date, with Axiom Space, a private company, planning to send its own modules to the station in parallel for purely commercial use.

NASA, ESA, JAXA and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) are working together to build a space station in orbit around the Moon, and Russia and China are working on a similar project, which would also include a base in surface.

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