Virtual reality therapy can serve as an effective complement to anesthesia for surgical procedures

XRHealth Launches Virtual Reality Telehealth Clinic in Israel

What you should know:

– Results of a clinical trial using software from XRHealth, developer and operator of virtual treatment rooms in the metaverse, published in PLOS ONE have demonstrated that virtual reality therapy can serve as an effective complement to anesthesia for procedures surgical. The trials were conducted with XRHealth’s immersive virtual reality software.

– Trial results showed that the majority of patients (13/17) using XRHealth VR technology did not require intravenous sedatives during surgery.


Using virtual reality to improve the patient experience

XRHealth is revolutionizing healthcare, bringing patient care into the metaverse. The company operates state-of-the-art virtual therapeutic care clinics using proprietary FDA and CE registered extended medical reality (XR) technology (virtual and augmented reality). XRHealth integrates immersive XR technology, licensed clinicians, and advanced data analytics into a single platform, delivering a complete therapeutic care solution that allows patients to receive treatment from the comfort of their own home. The company offers a variety of patent-pending solutions ranging from rehabilitation services to cognitive assessment and pain management training.

The clinical trial involved 34 patients undergoing hand and wrist surgery. All patients received peripheral nerve block prior to surgery. Patients were randomized to intraoperative immersive virtual reality with intravenous anesthesia given only as needed, or usual care as directed by the anesthetist. VR therapy software provided an immersive and engaging environment that guided patients through relaxation and pain reduction techniques while undergoing surgery.

The trial results showed that the majority of patients (13/17) using XRHealth VR technology did not require intravenous sedatives during surgery. A postoperative survey demonstrated similar levels of pain and anxiety in patients of the two control groups. Other secondary outcomes demonstrated that patients using VR technology recovered faster from anesthesia and left the recovery room sooner than those in the usual care group.

Anesthesia providers always try to balance the primary interests of patient comfort and safety. Our results demonstrate that virtual reality can help provide satisfactory pain and anxiety control for procedures such as upper extremity surgery with regional anesthesia,” says study lead author Brian O’ Gara, MD MPH, principal investigator at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. “This is extremely valuable as virtual reality can help avoid risky sedatives without compromising the patient experience. While the use of this technique can also help with perioperative efficiency, it has the potential to be a game-changer for patients and providers.

These results could lead to a discussion in the medical industry about the use of non-pharmaceutical interventions during surgical procedures that both improve the patient experience during surgery and provide better postoperative recovery.

The BIRD Foundation awarded XRHealth and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center $900,000 to conduct clinical trials to determine if immersive virtual reality can reduce sedation requirements and improve patient satisfaction during knee replacement surgery, and improve the quality of recovery after bariatric surgery.

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